Dennis Mitterer

Dennis Mitterer

M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Construction Management
Fire and Emergency Services Instructional Professor & Advisor
352-273-1084
RINKER 336

Dr. Mitterer completed his Ph.D. in Leadership and Organizational Change from Walden University focusing on the effects of a leader’s behavior on employee job satisfaction, productivity, engagement and turnover. Mitterer draws on social science theories to develop future leaders in the Fire and Emergency Services Program at Rinker School. Dr. Mitterer has extensive practical experience in leadership in the private sector, health care, emergency services, and in higher education.  

Dr. Mitterer has published numerous articles on diverse subjects related to safety in emergency services, risk management, the use of technology in the delivery of patient care, and leadership’s effect on trust and psychological safety. He has also published books on Personal Wellness, Finance, and Risk Management.  

Prior to joining UF, full time, Mitterer taught at Lebanon Valley College, Immaculata College, and the Pennsylvania College of Health. He earned his master’s degree in Management from Penn State University, Smeal Business College, bachelor’s degree from Penn State University, in nursing, and a bachelor’s degree in business from Elizabethtown College.  

Stathis G. Yeros

Stathis G. Yeros

School of Architecture
Assistant Professor
ARCH 256

Dr. Stathis G. Yeros completed his Ph.D. in Architectural History, Theory and Society at the University of California, Berkeley, focusing on how space affects and is affected by struggles for social justice, focusing on queer and transgender cultures and politics. His recent article, “AIDS and the City: Bathhouses, Emplaced Empathy, and the Desexualization of San Francisco” (Urban History) examines how the iconographies of domesticity and death during the AIDS devastation changed contemporary urban homosexual politics. Dr. Yeros has published on queer and trans-of color spatial activism and on the subject of queer ecologies (with Chandra Laborde, UC Berkeley). He is currently working on his book manuscript, Queering Urbanism: Architecture, Embodiment, and Queer Citizenship. The book analyzes intersectional politics and cultural representations of gender, race, bodily ability and sexuality in queer and trans spaces. It uses the lens of queer insurgent citizenship to rework the meaning of diversity and inclusion in the built environment as a set of rights rather than accommodations. Yeros is also co-organizer of the ongoing Queer Ecological Imaginations working group, a collaborative platform seeking to address pernicious environmental injustices at a time of ecological collapse, which is supported by the Townsend Center for the Humanities, and Cal’s Center for Race and Gender. Prior to his Ph.D. Yeros earned a master’s of architecture from Berkeley, where he was the recipient of a yearlong Branner Traveling Fellowship. He also earned a master’s in Art History and Theater from the University of Glasgow, and practiced architecture in San Francisco.

Jiayang Li

Jiayang Li

Department of Landscape Architecture, Florida Institute for Built Environment Resilience (FIBER)
Assistant Professor
ARCH 456

Dr. Jiayang Li is an interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersection of landscape design and climate change adaptation. Her research tackles the challenge of creating landscape change that makes communities more resilient and is welcomed by community members. Currently, Jiayang draws on social science theories and methods to study everyday landscape experiences and community perceptions of novel nature-based solutions. She has published in multiple top-ranked journals including Landscape and Urban Planning and given guest lectures and conferences presentations nationally and internationally. Jiayang earned her Ph.D. in Environment and Sustainability and Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of Michigan. She also holds a Bachelor of Engineering in Landscape Architecture from Tongji University in Shanghai, China. Before turning her primary focus to research, she had practiced in design firms including SmithGroup and AECOM.

Shenhao Wang

Shenhao Wang

Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Assistant Professor
ARCH 434

Dr. Shenhao Wang is an AI assistant professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Before coming here, he was a research scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Urban Mobility Lab and Human Dynamics Group in Media Lab. He focuses on developing interpretable and ethical deep-learning models to analyze individual decision-making. He synergizes discrete choice models and deep neural networks in travel demand modeling by opening up the “black box” deep learning with economic theory. Currently, he is designing socially-aware urban computing to incorporate unconventional data structures, seeking to generalize computational algorithms for urban studies. Wang completed his interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Computer and Urban Science at MIT in 2020. He received a bachelor’s in Economics from Peking University (2014) and a bachelor’s in architecture and law from Tsinghua University (2011), Master of Science in Transportation, and Master of City Planning from MIT (2017).

Ivy Hu

Ivy Hu

Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Chair, Department of Urban and Regional Planning; Associate Director, School of Landscape Architecture and Planning
(352) 294-3060
ARCH 431B

Lingqian (Ivy) Hu is a professor in Urban and Regional Planning who joined the University of Florida College of Design, Construction and Planning on July 1, 2022. She serves as the chair of the Department of Urban and Regional Planning as well as the associate director of the School of Landscape Architecture and Planning.

Professor Hu’s work has focused on the interrelationship between transportation and land use, with an emphasis on equity. She has extensive knowledge of real-world planning and policy efforts to promote just and prosperous cities, reduce socio-spatial inequity and enhance environmental justice and public health. Hu has been published extensively in prestigious urban planning and transportation journals, and has led more than $1 million funded research projects supported by the National Science Foundation and other agencies. One example of the impacts of her research is FlexRide Milwaukee, which pilots a new micro-transit service to address a long-term transportation gap in the Milwaukee region.

Before joining UF, Hu was a professor and the chair of the Urban Planning Department at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She received her Ph.D. (of Policy, Planning and Development) and master’s (in Planning) degrees from the University of Southern California and her bachelor’s degree (in Planning) from Nanjing University. She worked as a planner at the Southern California Association of Governments (Los Angeles) and the China Academy of Urban Planning and Design (Shenzhen, China). 

Jules Bruck

Jules Bruck

School of Landscape Architecture and Planning
Director, School of Landscape Architecture and Planning; Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture
(352) 294-3859
ARCH 431A

Dr. Jules Bruck, RLA, joined the University of Florida College of Design, Construction and Planning on July 1, 2022, as director of the School of Landscape Architecture and Planning and chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture. She came to DCP from the University of Delaware, where she was professor and founding director of the landscape architecture program. In those roles, she taught capstone and design process studios and courses in creativity, field sketching and ecological planting design. She is a registered landscape architect and a SITES Accredited Professional (AP).

In April 2018, she co-founded the Coastal Resilience Design Studio (CRDS). This Delaware Sea Grant-funded collaboration brings together educators, students, scientists, citizen-scientists, engineers, designers, artists and other academic institutions in Delaware to study and respond to issues affecting the state’s coastlines and coastal communities. CRDS work focuses on coastal challenges that stem from historical decisions, human settlement, sea-level rise and necessary compliance with water quality mandates. The goal of CRDS is to team community members with interdisciplinary experts and students to develop new strategies and manage special cases that threaten coastal communities. Ultimately, the studio hopes to drive policy to benefit coastal communities through more sustainable land use, planning and education. 

The CRDS was honored as the 2021 Coastal Estuarine Research Federation’s student contest winner. Their project, Carbon in the Tidewater, focused on Hampton, Virginia, which has a low elevation, high rate of land subsidence and intense storm surge risk. Students explored the use of the Global Carbon Market to finance self-regenerating nature-based coastal infrastructure. This project also received an honor award from the Pennsylvania-Delaware chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects.  

In the fall of 2021, Bruck became the co-director of UD’s Gerard J. Mangone Climate Science and Policy Hub. Over the past year, the Climate Change Hub developed the capacity of UD faculty and students to research and enhance courses with science-based climate change content by providing competitive awards for scholarship and teaching.  

Her research interests are coastal resilience, green infrastructure and public perception of sustainable landscape practices. She is the principal investigator for a collaborative project called Developing Engineering Practices using Ecosystem Design Solutions for Future Army (DEEDS). This four-year project will allow her diverse team to research shellfish-based living shoreline solutions. Bruck has a Ph.D. from Texas A&M University.

Eva Agapaki

Eva Agapaki

M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Construction Management
Assistant Professor
RINKER 314

Dr. Agapaki is an Artificial Intelligence Assistant Professor in the M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Construction Management. She brings 7 years of academic and industry experiences in data analytics, AI applications in civil engineering, infrastructure computer vision, Digital Twinning and automation in construction. She recently obtained her PhD from the University of Cambridge, where her research pioneered the automated generation of geometric Digital Twins of existing industrial facilities from Lidar data at a commercially viable level. She conducted part of her PhD research at MIT and was awarded the U.S. National Academy of Engineering grant for addressing one of the 14 Grand Challenges in Engineering of our century. She also holds an MSc in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering from UCLA and a BSc in Civil Engineering from the University of Patras in Greece. She has extensive industry experience working as Innovation Lead at PTC Boston, where she led innovation projects on computer vision and deep learning applications in the manufacturing industry, and AVEVA, where she advises the AI team on machine learning methods for complex data (3D point cloud processing methods).

 

Dr. Agapaki is the Director of the Digital Twins research lab. She is welcoming academic and industry collaborators. For more information, please visit: https://digitaltwins.dcp.ufl.edu/

Maria Watson

Maria Watson

M.E. Rinker, Sr, School of Construction Management, Shimberg Center for Housing Studies
Assistant Professor
RINKER 203

Maria Watson is an Assistant Professor in the M.E. Rinker, Sr, School of Construction Management and affiliated researcher with the Shimberg Center for Housing Studies. Before coming to the University of Florida, she was a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning and Hazard Reduction Recovery Center at Texas A&M University. She has degrees in Urban Planning from The Ohio State University and Texas A&M University.

Dr. Watson’s research focuses on the factors impacting community recovery after disaster events, particularly interdependencies between infrastructure, housing, and businesses. She is particularly interested in the effectiveness of disaster programs and how these programs can be structured to better meet recovery needs. Watson has been a part of multiple interdisciplinary disaster recovery research efforts in Texas, Louisiana and North Carolina after Hurricanes Ike, Harvey, Matthew, Florence, Laura, and Delta. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Federal Emergency Management Agency for her research.

Dr. Watson has taught courses in quantitative methods, local government, and urban planning. She is currently co-teaching BCN-6585 Principles of Sustainable Development and Construction at the Rinker School.

Chaofeng Wang

Chaofeng Wang

M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Construction Management
Assistant Professor
RINKER 342

Dr. Wang is specialized in computational mechanics, uncertainty and risk quantification, AI, and their applications in the natural and built environment. He joined the Rinker School as an Assistant Professor of Artificial Intelligence. Before that, he earned degrees in Engineering Mechanics and Civil Engineering from Central South University and Clemson University and worked as a postdoctoral scholar at University of California, Berkeley.

Research:

He has broad interests in the intelligent automation of design, construction and management of the next generation infrastructure system. He also develops cyberinfrastructure that leverages stochastic physics-based simulation, AI and data mining techniques for multi-scale modeling of the built and natural environment under chronic and acute stressors, which leads to informed decision-makings. Particularly, his focal areas include foundational issues in AI, data, and material sciences, such as: mechanism of neural networks, uncertainty quantification and dimension reduction of data and models, explainability and interpretability of algorithms and inferences, constitutive modeling and design of future construction materials.

Publications: Google Scholar

Teaching:

DCP 4300 – AI in Built Environment – Spring/2022/2023

DCP 5905/6905 – Advanced AI Systems – Fall/2022

Students: Strongly motivated students are always invited to join my research group. Please email me (chaofeng.wang /at/ ufl.edu) your CV and a concise cover letter expressing your interests. Collaborations from the academia and industry are welcome.

Karla Saldaña Ochoa

Karla Saldaña Ochoa

School of Architecture
Assistant Professor
(352) 294-1453
ARCH 252

Karla is an Ecuadorian architect; with a Master of Advanced Studies in Landscape Architecture from ETH Zurich. In June 2021, she finished her Ph.D. at ETH Zurich, which investigated the integration of Artificial and Human Intelligence to have a precise and agile response to natural disasters. Since August 2021, Karla is an Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Florida; her teaching and research focus on investigating the interplay of Artificial and Human Intelligence in architectural practices at building and urban scale. Karla is the leading researcher at SHARE Lab; a research group focused on developing human-centered AI projects focused on design practices.

Please visit SHARE Lab website if you want to know more or if you want to collaborate

www.ai-share-lab.com

Gator Nation Giving Day

Gator Nation Giving Day

Scroll to Top