Courses

Below are the current course offerings from the Historic Preservation Program.

DCP 6710 History and Theory of Historic Preservation (3.0 credits)

Fall Semester

Instructor: Cleary Larkin, Ph.D.

Description: 

Heritage must evolve in order to survive. Working with other disciplines and engaging stakeholders, historic preservation specialists manage change in the physical environment. This course explores the origins and development of the historic preservation movement and discipline (also referred to as heritage conservation) both domestically and globally. Course participants will examine the historical and theoretical underpinnings of historic preservation and the forces impacting the conservation of heritage including, among others, globalization, urbanization, climate change, and human conflict, among others.

Objectives:

  • Acquire familiarity with the origins, history, and development of the historic preservation movement
  • Understand the basic philosophical principles that have shaped historic preservation
  • Gain an understanding of the various disciplines that make-up historic preservation
  • Examine the policies, regulations, and guidelines governing the conservation of heritage in the United States and abroad
  • Assess current and future challenges to conserving heritage

DCP 6711C Built Heritage: History and Materials Conservation I (3.0 credits)

Fall Semester

Instructor: Linda Stevenson, Ph.D.

Description: 

This course explores the social, cultural, and material developments that shape the historical design trends and construction technology of the pre-20th century American built environment, from early vernacular building traditions to the construction of the post-Civil War period. By examining historic construction methods and the behavior of building materials and systems, participants will gain experience with: identifying typical material pathologies, applying a methodology for assessments, selecting an appropriate treatment approach (Preservation,

Rehabilitation, Restoration as defined in The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines), and understanding strategies for the technical requirements of treating building materials and systems.  The study of applied preservation methods for historic structures and materials is supported through hands-on work in the UF Preservation Institute St. Augustine (PISA) Lab.

Objectives:

  • Understand the evolution of American architecture from the 17th through late 19th century (post-Civil War period – c. 1870).
  • Understand the process and methodology for researching an architectural trend, type or theme, and for situating the architectural trend, type or theme within local, regional, national, and global contexts.
  • Compare historic building principles, traditions, technologies, techniques, and processes.
  • Recognize evidence of historic construction techniques and apply the information to synthesize development histories of historic structures.
  • Understand the various treatment approaches and levels of interventions for historic buildings and sites (The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards & Guidelines).
  • Understand and identify pathologies for historic building systems and materials. (Wood, masonry, metals, stucco, coatings and paints, glass, plaster and early concrete).

DCP 6712C Built Heritage: History and Materials Conservation II (3.0 credits)

Spring Semester

Instructor: Linda Stevenson, Ph.D.

Description:

This course explores the social, cultural and material developments which shape the historical design trends and construction technology of the American built environment, with a focus on 20th century American-built heritage resources. By examining historic construction methods and the behavior of building materials and systems, participants will gain experience with; identifying typical material pathologies, applying a methodology for assessments, selecting an appropriate treatment approach (Preservation, Rehabilitation, Restoration, as defined in The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards and Guidelines), and understanding strategies for the technical requirements of treating building materials and systems. The study of applied preservation methods for historic structures and materials is supported through hands-on work in the UF Preservation Institute St. Augustine (PISA) Lab.

Objectives:

  • Identify key features of major design movements of the 20th century, with a focus on the post-war period from 1945-1975 in America, and the regional adaptations found in Florida.
  • Apply knowledge of the process and methodology for researching 20th-century architectural trends, types or themes, and for situating the architectural trend, type or theme within local, regional, national, and global contexts.
  • Apply the evidence of historic construction techniques and recent interventions to synthesize development histories of 20t--century structures.
  • Understand and identify pathologies for historic building systems and materials.
  • Apply the various treatment approaches (The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards & Guidelines) and levels of interventions for 20th-century historic buildings and sites
  • Technical responses to the emerging issues of sustainability and resiliency
  • Apply best practices of preserving built heritage for interventions in historic buildings, structures and sites.

DCP 6714 Built Heritage Documentation I (3.0 credits)

Fall Semester

Instructor: Sujin Kim, Ph.D.

Description:

This course explores documentation principles and practices for built heritage, from traditional field surveys to 3D digital technologies. Students undertake representations and research for a historic property, location TBD per semester. The class will record as-built conditions through photographic surveys and measured CAD drawings (a full set or partial), referring to the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) and other guidelines. Given the remote location of the project site, the class explores and encourages 3D virtual experience and digital analysis using the laser scan data (point cloud) alongside field surveys. Additional scope of work may include documentation for a Historic Structure Report (HSR), such as archival and field research, written and graphical representations of building evolution history, statement of significance, and existing condition assessment.

Objectives:

Read and represent the as-built condition of a historic building:

  • Understand how the historic spaces, forms, structures, and details have changed through cross-analyzing archival resources and the existing condition.
  • Identify conservation issues in the field and discuss potential causes and treatments.
  • Apply 3D digital analyses (flying through, turning, slicing, measuring, isolating, etc.) to documentation.
  • Utilize existing condition drawings and mappings for heritage study and communication.
  • Gain skills needed for the multifaceted documentation and study of built heritage.

DCP 6715 Built Heritage Documentation II (3.0 credits)

Spring Semester

Instructor: Sujin Kim, Ph.D.

Description:

This course trains students in digital technologies, from 3D digital imaging to website design, that can be used for recording and communicating cultural resources, including built heritage. For those who seek careers in built environment disciplines, historic preservation, and other cultural heritage fields, this course helps boost and showcase their professional skillsets. Digital documentation training includes terrestrial laser scanning, photography, and 3D photogrammetry (the technique of capturing and generating 3D objects by overlapping 2D photographs). The course also requires students to design and produce their website using Esri ArcGIS StoryMaps. The website contents can include digital imaging products from this course and students’ other course and thesis projects. The instructors provide training in graphic design basics as well as the software tool.

Objectives:

  • Learn 3D digital documentation, from data acquisition to data processing (data use/application is covered in Built Heritage Documentation I).
  • Gain and enhance the graphic design and online platform development skills to share place-related research with the public.  

DCP 6943 Cultural Resource Survey (3.0 credits)

Spring Semester

Instructor: Linda Stevenson, Ph.D.

Description:

This course will explore the application of research methods to investigate, inventory and document the built resources of existing neighborhoods that contains historical structures from multiple periods of significance.

Objectives:

The participants will gain working skills in the following area of historic preservation practice:

  • Develop an understanding of the broader development context for the Gainesville area, with an emphasis on the post WWII period.
  • Identify and document historic resources within a defined community, while gaining skills in using the Florida Master Site File system and in mapping techniques.
  • Engage stakeholders by conducting public workshops, focus groups and interviews.
  • Assess the research findings and develop recommendations for preservation strategies for the subject community.
  • Provide recommendations for research and inventory work in conjunction with the development of a model process for assessing mid-century modern resources in communities across Florida, for presentation at future conferences.
  • Develop strategies for working in communities with a focus on cultural resource values.

DCP 6716 Cultural Resource Management (3.0 credits)

Semester TBD

Instructor: Cleary Larkin, Ph.D. or Linda Stevenson, Ph.D.

Description:

Cultural Resource Management (CRM) includes the identification, documentation, preservation, and interpretation of significant heritage. Employing multidisciplinary approaches, CRM can involve a range of professions including, but not limited to, historic preservation, history, public history, museum studies, heritage tourism, design (architecture, interior, landscape, and urban). This course focuses on the built environment (tangible heritage) and sites of historical, cultural, and/or architectural importance. Of particular interest are issues of community equity, social justice, and inclusive heritage. As an applied learning and research course, the goal, within the context of the larger community, is to record the history of the site, assess its existing conditions, and prepare recommendations for its preservation. The goal is to produce the data needed to inform a Historic Structure Report (HSR).

Objectives:

  • Identify and engage stakeholders and values associated with a heritage site; and
  • Explore local, state, and federal policies impacting the management of cultural resources, and
  • Acquire skills in researching, assessing, and describing the history and cultural significance of a heritage resource; and
  • Apply a variety of techniques (analog and digital) to record a heritage resource; and
  • Document and diagnosis causes of existing conditions at heritage sites; and
  • Establish a preservation approach that adheres to the U.S. Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties and other national and international standards; and Develop recommendations for the preservation and interpretation of a heritage community and resource.

DCP 6701 World Heritage Research and Stewardship

DCP 6XXX (TBD) Preservation Policy and Current Topics

Summer B: 6.0 credits

Instructor: Cleary Larkin, Ph.D.

Description:

Officially founded in 1972, PIN is America’s oldest, continually operating applied learning and research program (“field school”) for historic preservation. The mission of PIN is to help prepare the next generation of historic preservation leaders while documenting, researching, and conserving the Island community’s cultural resources. The summer program introduces students to the historic coastal community of Nantucket, designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark District in 1966 based primarily on its leading role in the global whaling industry from the late 18th through mid-19th centuries. Projects change every summer but recent projects have included documentation and assessment of cultural and historical resources and landscapes, assessment of historic materials conditions, vulnerability assessment of cultural heritage and landscapes, exploration of strategies for adaptation and mitigation of the island’s built heritage to enhance resilience. Students will have opportunities to learn from multi-disciplinary practitioners and subject matter experts, as well as work with local policy, governmental, advocacy, arts and conservation organizations. PIN’s legacy acknowledges multi-disciplinary scholarship as central to the discipline of Historic Preservation.

Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of the history and current condition of the island and Town of Nantucket;
  • Explore the impacts of population, tourism, sea level rise, and climate change on heritage resources;
  • Examine policies governing the management of heritage resources and historic coastal communities being impacted by sea level rise and climate change;
  • Learn and employ best practices for undertaking an integrated approach to cultural resource surveys, conditions assessments, and vulnerability assessments;
  • Establish a preservation approach that considers policy, design, conservation, education and interpretation as solutions for a resilient future.
  • Consider and implement strategies for engaging stakeholders and the community of Nantucket through written, graphic and oral presentation skills.
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